Dementia Inequities in Indigenous Populations: Translation of Ethnographic Community-Based Participatory Research Findings to Culturally Safe Dementia Care Tools

Monday, 03/01/2021, 1:15 pm.

Location: Online

Kristen Jacklin – Department of Family Medicine and BioBehavioral Health, University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth, will discuss “Dementia Inequities in Indigenous Populations: Translation of Ethnographic Community-Based Participatory Research Findings to Culturally Safe Dementia Care Tools.”

1:15pm EST, March 1, https://umn.zoom.us/j/95756751287

Dr. Jacklin is a Professor in the Department of Family Medicine and Biobehavioral Health as well as the Associate Director of the Memory Keepers Medical Discovery Team – Health Equity (MK-MDT) at the University of Minnesota Medical School, Duluth Campus.

Dr. Jacklin is a medical anthropologist with an extensive background in community-based Indigenous health research and health equity. Her research focuses on chronic disease care for Indigenous peoples, including investigations concerning aging; cognitive health and dementia; diabetes; and Indigenous health/medical education. Dr. Jacklin leads the Indigenous Cultural Understandings of Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias – Research and Exchange (I-CARE) program of research which pairs community-based participatory research (CBPR) approaches with Indigenous methodologies to address dementia disparities in Indigenous populations. She also co-leads with Dr. Wayne Warry, the Center for Community Engaged Rural Dementia and Alzheimer’s Research (CERDAR). CERDAR uses CBPR approaches to engage rural participants in projects concerning the prevention, diagnosis and care for people with dementia in rural communities. Dr. Jacklin is the founder of the International Indigenous Dementia Research Network and the Indigenous Cognition Awareness and Aging Awareness Research Exchange (I-CAARE.ca).

 

Dr. Jacklin has expertise in community-based participatory research, Indigenous methodologies, qualitative and ethnographic methods as well as specializing in highly integrative research designs. Much of her current research is multi-sited, diversity-focused, with a critical anthropological lens. Her Indigenous projects additionally layer a two-eyed seeing framework. She has expertise in health equity, Indigenous aging and health, knowledge translation and exchange, cross-cultural medicine and cultural safety, and Indigenous and rural medical education.

 

MINNESOTA DEMOGRAPHY AND AGING SEMINAR
These seminars are designed for researchers studying issues at the intersections of topics related to the life course and demography.

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