Cross-Center Administrative Supplement Program 

young researchers brainstorming with mentorNIA administrative supplements provide additional funds to an active grant to support research in the field of aging. The Centers on the Demography and Economics of Aging and Centers on the Demography and Economics of Alzheimer’s Disease/Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (AD/ADRD) (P30 Centers, for short) are eligible hosts of administrative supplements. The goal of the program is to increase the number of junior scholars making successful applications for supplement funding. One opportunity of special interest is Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health-Related Research but others may be possible. The Coordinating Center helps facilitate the process of matching junior scholars (final year doctoral students, post-docs, and assistant professors) with a P30 Center that would sponsor them to apply for a supplement.

Examples of potential matches:

  • A doctoral student working with an affiliate of a given P30 Center and in her final year is interested in working as a post-doc with an affiliate at one of the other P30 Centers. The supplement provides support for one year of post-doctoral work at the sponsoring university.
  • A current post-doctoral fellow working with an affiliate of a given P30 Center wishes to pursue further post-doctoral training with an affiliate at one of the other P30 Centers.
  • If the candidate seeking a supplement secures a job as an assistant professor (or similar), this does not rule out keeping the supplement funding. If the candidate is continuing to work in the field of aging, it may be possible to transfer the funding to the institution (if different from the original destination institution).
  • An assistant professor at one aging center identifies a senior member of the faculty at another aging center interested in supporting a supplement application.

Information for junior scholars interested in applying

The cross-Center supplement program is targeted to all doctoral students in their final year, post-docs, and assistant professors interested in pursuing aging-related work at one of the currently participating Centers listed here:

Participating Centers and 2021-2022 

  • Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging (CEDA), University of California, Berkeley
  • Center for Health Aging Behaviors and Longitudinal Investigations (CHABLIS), University of Chicago
  • Life Course Center for the Demography and Economics of Aging (LCC), University of Minnesota
  • USC/UCLA Center on Biodemography and Population Health (CBPH), University of Southern California
  • Center for Advancing Sociodemographic and Economic Study of Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (CEASES-ADRD), University of Southern California
  • Center for Aging and Policy Studies (CAPS), Syracuse University
  • Center for Demography of Health and Aging (CDHA), University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Center on Aging & Population Sciences (CAPS), University of Texas, Austin
  • Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging (MiCDA)
  • Population Aging Research Center (PARC), University of Pennsylvania

List of Centers with their priority research areas

Step 1: Provide the administrator of your P30 Center with the following information to help them determine your eligibility to apply for a supplement:

  1. A brief paragraph (<200 words) describing your area of aging and health interest
  2. Year of your PhD or post-doc
  3. Your citizen status
  4. A copy of your current CV
  5. Check specific eligibility for the supplement you are interested in

Visit “Diversity Supplement and Re-Entry Program Guidelines” for an excellent overview of the diversity supplement program.

Eligibility criteria for the Diversity Supplement are listed below:

  1. Individuals from racial and ethnic groups that have been shown by the NSF to be underrepresented in health-related sciences on a national basis: Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian and other Pacific Islander.
  2. Individuals with disabilities, who are defined as those with a physical or mental impairment that substantially limits one or more major life activities, as described in the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, as amended.
  3. Individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, defined as those who meet two or moreof the following criteria:
    • Were or currently are homeless, as defined by the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act
    • Were or currently are in the foster care system, as defined by the Administration for Children and Families
    • Were eligible for the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program for two or more years
    • Have/had no parents or legal guardians who completed a bachelor’s degree
    • Were or currently are eligible for Federal Pell grants
    • Received support from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) as a parent or child
    • Grew up in one of the following areas: a) a U.S. rural area, as designated by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Rural Health Grants Eligibility Analyzer orb) a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services-designated Low-Income and Health Professional Shortage Areas. Only one of the two possibilities in #7 can be used as a criterion for the disadvantaged background definition.
  4. Literature shows that women from the above backgrounds (categories A, B, and C) face particular challenges at the graduate level and beyond in scientific fields.

Step 2: If you are eligible to apply for a supplement, you should review the list of faculty affiliates at participating Centers to identify potential faculty members you would be interested in working with on the supplement. Let your Center administrator know the names of faculty (and their Center) you are interested in working with. They will be in touch with you if we are able to make a match.

Information for Centers

Step 1: Contact all doctoral students in their 4th or final year, post-docs, and assistant professors affiliated with your Center. Describe what an administrative supplement is and why it may be of interest to them, and, if they are interested, ask them to complete a short eligibility survey that includes this information:

  1. A brief paragraph (<200 words) describing their area of aging and health interest (see the list of Centers’ priority research areas)
  2. Year of PhD or post-doc (must be in final year of doctoral studies or in a current post-doc)
  3. Their citizen status (must be U.S.)
  4. Their current CV (this will help us match them with a sponsor affiliate)
  5. Their eligibility for the supplement they are interested in

Step 2: Contact eligible doctoral students and post-docs, and assistant professors to encourage them to review the priority research areas of the participating Centers and identify faculty they may be interested in working with, Have then share that information with you. Let them know we will be working on creating potential matches.

Step 3: Forward eligibility information with interested students to the Coordinating Center.

Step 4: Coordinating Center matches candidates with sponsor Centers.

Step 5: Sponsoring Centers coordinate work between eligible students to facilitate the joint application with the destination Center.

 

List of Sponsoring Centers and Priority Research Areas

Center on the Economics and Demography of Aging (CEDA), University of California, Berkeley
Biology, genetics and demography of aging; Consequences of U.S. and global aging; Health trends and disparities; Determinants of health, well-being and longevity; Population, economic and health forecasting; Behavioral economics.

Center for Health Aging Behaviors and Longitudinal Investigations (CHABLIS), University of Chicago
Individual healthy aging behaviors; Family, networks and the life course; Aging in community and larger social contexts; Health outcomes at the hospital, neighborhood, and municipal levels; Measurement and methods for longitudinal studies on aging; Models of care for medically and social complex older adults; Integration of systemic and oral health; Personalized medicine and preemptive pharmacogenetic testing, including in minority populations.

Life Course Center for the Demography and Economics of Aging (LCC), University of Minnesota
Later life-course population; Trends in context; Life-course dynamics as disparity mechanisms; Interrelationships of work, family, community participation, and health.

USC/UCLA Center on Biodemography and Population Health (CBPH), University of Southern California
Biology, genetics and demography of aging; Cognitive aging and the demography of dementia; Determinants of health, well-being and longevity; Health trends and disparities

Center for Advancing Sociodemographic and Economic Study of Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (CEASES-ADRD), University of Southern California
Cognitive health and dementia trends and disparities; Population, economic and health forecasting; Behavioral economics; Economics of aging; Disability, health care, unpaid family care and long-term care; Implications of health policy; Cognitive aging and the demography of dementia.

Center for Aging and Policy Studies (CAPS), Syracuse University
Health trends, disparities, and determinants; Family and intergenerational supports; Effects of place on health and aging; Effects of social, economic, and healthcare policy on health and aging; Health and aging of specific populations; Disability and long-term care.

Center for Demography of Health and Aging (CDHA), University of Wisconsin-Madison
Aging and the life course; Biodemography; Determinants of disparities of aging trajectories; Health economics and health services research; Impacts of place on aging processes; social genomics.

Center on Aging & Population Sciences (CAPS), University of Texas, Austin
 Life course precursors of advantage and disadvantage at older ages; Family demography; Social engagement, and social isolation; Place, aging, and health.

Michigan Center on the Demography of Aging (MiCDA)
Biology, genetics and demography of aging; Cognitive aging and the demography of dementia; Determinants of health, well-being and longevity; Disability, health care and long-term care; Health trends and disparities; Health and well-being in later life; Aging, genetics and social science; Survey measurement and methods; Family caregiving to older adults.

Population Aging Research Center (PARC), University of Pennsylvania
Health disparities in aging; Early life conditions and older adult health; Behavior and well-being; global aging and health; Health care and long-term care in older adults; Cognition and Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementia (ADRD); COVID-19 & Aging.